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Hear Straight Up From Africans

Africa.com has recently introduced a 30-mn documentary 'Straight Up' available online with this simple objective: to change the way the world sees Africa. As stated on causes.com, this short documentary about Africa is not about war, poverty, and hardship but is instead speaking about the challenges and successes occurring across Africa today.



 " We do that with our on the ground coverage of news, finance, travel, and arts and culture—but sometimes a written article isn’t enough. There are times when you need to see the rise of a new building to understand the economic impact of a real estate project or hear the laugh of a child in a classroom to witness the progress of an educational system," the Africa.com editorial staff wrote on a blog's post announcing the release of the documentary.

The film is a great piece that addresses well the harmful misconceptions the rest of the world has about the African continent and its beautiful people.

Certainly, most African countries are not as wealthy as other countries located in Europe or America. However, some of them are full of smart, creative, educated, healthy, and  rich individuals who make a difference in their neighborhoods and/or worldwide.

" We set out to produce 'Africa Straight Up', a film that gives you an inside look at what we see when we look at Africa. We see a continent full of progress and passion in technology, business, education, governance, and arts and culture. With a soundtrack of Africa’s hottest music stars, Lira and M.I., the film takes viewers on a journey across the continent to show how deep, rich, and complex Africa truly is," the Africa.com editorial staff wrote on their blog.

In the documentary 'Africa Straight Up', viewers can hear from African leaders such as Nigerian Finance Minister and former World Bank Director Dr. Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala; Nigerian business mogul and Africa's richest man, Aliko Dangote; Kenyan technology activist and Policy Manager for Google Africa Ory Okolloh. There are also contributions from powerhouse networks BET, MTV and Sony Music.



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