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Forever now I'll be writing for a change

Last year, I wrote an article "Why I Majored in International Journalism",  in which I extensively explained the reasons behind my choice of career: becoming a journalist. 

Forever Now I'll be writing for a change 
This May 2013, I became an international journalist through the reception of my Master's Degree in International Journalism from Baylor University. At this time, I feel equipped to head to the next level in my career, thanks to my extensive internship experience and my excellent academic background. Special shout out to each individual who has accompanied me in this adventure!

Like all other recent graduates, the burning question in my head is : What's Next? Getting this degree was  for me  the proof for my calling, which is using my writing for a change forever now. For a start, get ready to read my thoughts more on this blog. I also intend to express my viewpoints as a freelance writer or  a guest blogger on the right platforms.

Women and Africans have the answers to their problems and as result, the world needs to listen. Well, my conviction to make a change is stronger than ever! The world needs to know about the success stories of women and Africans. I am definitely motivated to use my blog as a positive platform for women and Africa, as I came across numerous organizations and individuals who advocate for women and/or Africa online. There will always be issues because perfection is not from this world. However, my goal is to show off that women and Africans stand strong whenever facing their challenges.

Forever now, I'll be writing for a change to come in the lives of my sisters and my mothers around the world. Millions of women like Reeyot Alemu are making history in their own unique ways. Reeyot Alemu, a journalist from Ethiopia, is the recipient of the 2012 IWMF Courage in Journalism Award. According to the International Women's Media Foundation (IWMF), Alemu was arrested in June 21, 2011 and branded as a terrorist by the current government.
"I believe that I must contribute something to bring a better future, "Alemu said in an earlier interview with the IWMF. "Since there are a lot of injustices and oppressions in Ethiopia, I must reveal and oppose them in my articles." Alemu said one of her "principles" is "to stand for the truth, whether it is risky or not."
Forever now, I'll be writing for a change to come in the lives of my fellow Africans. Thanks to social networks (Facebook, Twitter), I am confident that Africans will now write their stories in their own perspectives. As reported in a TechZim online article, this was the case of the recent presidential election in Kenya. On behalf of his employer, CNN correspondent in Kenya, David McKenzie, apologized to Kenyans for posting a video report on suspected terrorist bombing that took place in downtown Nairobi. The online Kenyan community used the hashtag #SomeoneTellCNN to protest against the false interpretation of facts of their election; the latter became a global trending topic on the Twittersphere on Sunday, March 11, 2012.



Some may label me as a 'feminist' and others as a 'pan-Africanist.' If these labels help them to get a better understanding of what I am doing, let be it. However, I would like to stress this. I am not after labels or tags. All I want is to have an impact through my writing. My goal is to raise awareness and to tell the truth because I have a passion for issues related to women and Africa. I am not lusting after any political involvement either. I believe there are enough aspiring politicians out there. I want to be among those who held authorities accountable. 

Believe me, I found myself overwhelmed by the task ahead at times. Thanks to some friends, I stay right on course. I think of my favorite Baylor pre-med student from Mali who always listens to my discourse on how I'll go about changing Africa and/or the world. Also, there is Mrs. Anderson who had instantaneously believed in me when she heard the vision I had for my continent.  To my Facebook status: "Tell me, what I'm gonna do forever now #NeYo", she replied:  "Change the world, girl! Yes, you will ... with your writing." I couldn't help but to share it with my friends ... who actually agreed with her! I think I can do that!

 Are you ready to join me forever now in my goal of using my writing for a change?

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Your opinion matters/ Votre opinion compte

What do you think of my articles? Do you have any ideas? If yes, please write a comment or contact me!

Que pensez-vous de mes articles? Avez-vous des idées? Si oui, laissez un commentaire ou contactez-moi!

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