Skip to main content

College student raises money for families in Kenya with CARE for AIDS

College student Gilbert Bongmba wants to impact lives positively. Along with other college students, he joined the CARE for AIDS University (CFAU) at Baylor University.

Tea with Susan (Photo: CARE for AIDS)
This year, Bongmba currently serves on the Executive Board of CARE for AIDS University at Baylor as a committee member. According to Bongmba, CARE for AIDS is an organization that exists to help mobilize the church in caring, both physically and spiritually, for families affected by HIV/AIDS in Kenya.



"Our goal for the school year is to raise at least $50,000 as a student chapter. I have pledged to raise $500," Bongmba said. "I believe I can reach this goal with the help of family, friends and generous donors.

This young man from Cameroon said to be passionnate about CARE for AIDS because Africa which is his continent of origin is considered the origin of HIV/AIDS.  Author of the uplifting article 'How Cameroon and other African countries are actively fighting the HIV/AIDS pandemic', Bongmba intends to offer assistance to those with HIV and to reduce the spread of the stigma through CARE for AIDS.

"It beats my imagination to know that 72% of people with HIV currently live in Sub-Saharan Africa. Because of this, the imperative to do something about the situation of HIV/AIDS in Africa is undeniable," Bongmba said. 

A CARE for AIDS team (Photo: CARE for AIDS)

According to Bongmba, donations will help clients receive medical support, spiritual and emotional counseling, vocational training, and food to supplement their diet. Over a 9-month program, individuals will be revived and empowered as they return to being a spouse, parent and provider. The CFUA team stated that contributions are 100% tax-deductible in the United States of America.

To support Bongmba in his fundraising project, please click here. You may also contact him directly on Twitter or Facebook. He also asked prayers for himself and the team as they try to reach their goals to make a difference for families affected by HIV/AIDS in Kenya, and for the families themselves.

Popular posts from this blog

March 8 is a special day for millenniums too

Over 100 years later, one may ask whether the celebration of the International Women's Day is still relevant today? The responses you will read below are those of four millenniums and W&A supporters. They have agreed to share their opinions with you and to explain what this special day means to them.
"The celebration of the International Women's Day is still relevant because women are still struggling to reach the gender equality. As a young African women, I can say with confidence that male dominance is still obvious in our societies. Understanding the reason behind March 8th is important for women.

Two American graduate students raise funds for South African students with The Project Ubuntu

Inspired by their recent summer study abroad program in South Africa, Elizabeth Patterson and Amber Lodman made the decision to create The Ubuntu Project upon their return to their home country, the United States of America.  The Project Ubuntu is a grassroots fundraising effort to help students of the Bachana Mockwena and Reinotswe special schools in South Africa.  Elizabeth Patterson and Amber Lodman, the two founders of the Project Ubuntu, started the fundraiser with the aim of providing funds for infrastructure building as well as dinning halls for meals. This summer of 2013, they both went to South Africa to study education and social reform.

Five powerful African women

Forbes has just released the official list of the world's 100 most powerful women of 2013. I am not sure which criteria Forbes experts used. Based on the list, they have probably included criteria such financial or diplomatic influence. However, I was disappointed to notice the insignificant representation of African women on the list. This may be partly explained by the background of those in charge of the selection.